Fairy Garden Plant Abuse

The instructions and care tag for this plant should be ……”provide unrelenting abuse”.

air-plant-abusedI am ashamed to admit that I am not the best plant nurturer around, but this time I’ve out done myself. While shopping for a few plants to use in display gardens for a show I impulsively grabbed a few interesting things called air plants. I believe they were $1.50 each . I went home armed with all the information I had about these plants which was..they were called air plants at the nursery and they had been displayed laying about on a screen.

I deduced that soil was undesirable. I loosely wrapped a bit of thin wire around them and ‘picked’ them into a sandy area of an arid fairy garden display for the show. And away we went out into the snow storm to the show.

After the show I  didn’t see the air plants in the bottom of the box I was unpacking and they were stowed into the attic in the empty box for about 2 weeks . When I next discovered them I brought them downstairs and just popped them into a small empty clay pot so they would stand up. Next thing I knew the cat had them! I rescued one immediately but the cat was on to me and dashed up the stairs into an inaccessible crawl space under the eaves.  For several days I could sometimes hear the cat playing with plant. This involved biting it, tossing it in the air, batting it around up and down the stairs etc. All the usual cat nonsense.

Finally, I did get my hands on the poor abused plant, popped it back in the clay pot and down graded the abuse to simply ignoring it completely. I couldn’t really tell if it was alive or not. It looked about the same as when I had last seen it…I’m not even sure how long ago that was, but today I noticed that it is growing and starting to flower!

I fully intend to rectify my complete ignorance about this plant. What do you know about these marvels?

As always keep having a  fairy good time …and hello, welcome and thank you to all my new followers. Feel free to shoot me a line. Always happy to hear what others are doing in the fairy garden and miniature garden DIY world.

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Itsy Bitsy Fairy Garden Stuff

Pill Bottle Fairy House

Pill Bottle Fairy House

I’m just nuts about seriously tiny fairy garden stuff. Micro things.

One day I happened upon an open tub of drywall compound (not at all unusual in our house) on my way to toss out an empty prescription bottle. The urge hit, and I quickly had the top half inch and the cap sawed off the bottle and dunked into the muck.

There’s always some buckets of pebbles and stone on hand where ever I am, so I poked a few into the muck – chopped up a bit of bark –  pinched a tad of artificial moss from my fairy garden supplies – a bit of glue -a drop of  paint – voila! A miniature fairy house.

It’s not fancy, and it’s not going to sell on Etsy …or anywhere else for that matter. But the few minutes taken out of a busy day to follow my whim was sheer delight.

Now, the teensy weensy miniature garden pebble chairs and table? That’s another fairy garden story. Now go make a 15 minute fairy garden story of your own!

As always, have a fairy good time! Marthe

Fairy Garden Supplies – A Unique Source

I wonder if many fairy gardeners also have fish? If you don’t keep fish, then you probably haven’t discovered that the aquarium store is a surprisingly great place to get DIY fairy garden supplies!

mushroom-log-aquarium-decoration

Mushroom Log Aquarium Decoration

The aquarium decoration isle will yield some interesting results.  This mushroom log is 8″ x 4″x 7″ and sells (in Canada) for $15. It just needs a little DIY fairy door to make it a wonderful fairy house for your miniature garden. Bonus – aquarium decor is non-toxic.

aquasand

‘Aqua Sand’ Aquarium Substrate

Now for landscaping your fairy abode. The substrate section alone can fascinate me for an hour. The unbelievable variety of stone, gravel, and course sands- aka miniature landscaping aggregates- comes in quantities that are ideal for various sized fairy gardening projects. Many of the substrates are coated with 100% environmentally friendly resin, – no dust. The coating also keeps them looking pretty and prevents any undesirable elements leaching into your garden when you water. A 5lb bag runs around $7. Next, take a look over in the reptile section.

small reptile feeder

Small Reptile Feeder

Reptile feeders are designed to blend in with a rock, stone and wood environment and need to have uneven surfaces for reptiles to crawl on. This makes them ideal for use as a miniature fairy garden ponds! Add a little acrylic water and decorate with  some miniature lily pads, a frog or some fish. This feeder measures 4.5″ x 4″ x 1″ and retails for just  $4.

While you’re in the reptile department also take a look at some of the bedding. You can find some nice sized bags of bark chips for your garden or DIY fairy house project. They also have some reptile carpets that make nice lawns that are meant to get wet.

As always- have a fairy good time…this time at the aquarium store! Let me know how you make out…

 

 

Two Brown Thumbs?

Do you want a fairy garden but have two brown thumbs? It can be done. I have two suggestions; artificial plants and flowers,  really easy care inexpensive plants.fairy-garden-french-chateau-field-stoen-tiles-artificial-palts-mostly

This fairy garden uses mostly artificial plants and flowers. The sunflowers in the foreground are commercially made miniature sunflowers. I’ve augmented them a little buy cutting little pieces from an artificial fern and tucking these in around the bottom. I wrapped a bit of wire around the bits and pieces to make them into little picks to make it easier to insert them into the soil. I used these along the edge of the stone walkway for a hedge affect as well.

The tree was also made from an artificial fern (from the dollar store) I butchered and reassembled it on some twigs from the yard to give it a nice tree appearance. The other yellow flowers and the trellis with purple flowers near the fairy house door are made of polymer clay and are very easy to do.

I’ve tucked a bit of artificial moss under the yellow clay flowers, under the windows on the house and under the tree.

Finally, for real plants, small succulents from your local nursery are usually very inexpensive, have a nice scale for a fairy garden and are almost impossible to …shhhh..you know. Moss is also a great idea for an easy care fairy garden, particularly in a terrarium where it should not even require watering… but more on that in my next post

So, brown thumbs or not..go make a fairy garden already. As always…have a fairy good time! Marthe

Fairy Garden Pebble Mosaic Path

Make a Fairy Garden Path

Making your own fairy garden accessories is fun, easy and cost effective. Here’s a really quick project that you can do yourself or do with kids.

Materials

Craft foam
glue
artificial moss
pebbles

Cut a shape from the foam to build your path on. Paths that are meandering look nice.

Use glue to attach stones in a mosaic pattern – swirls, circles, flowers, a twisting tree… whatever you dream up.

Fill in any little gaps or holes with a dab of glue and some shredded moss.

Here’s a pic of mine:) Have a fairy good time!
mini-pebble-mosaic-pathway

Make a Fairy Pond

miniature fairy pond to make

This little pond is 4″ in diameter across the water section. It took about 4 hours to make including drying time for silicone and acrylic ‘water’. I used my favorite, always at hand, beach pebbles.

And here’s how you can do it too…

 

 

 

Stuff You’ll Need

GE Silicone II or other caulking that adheres to stone

Caulking gun

Piece of burlap or perhaps fiber drywall tape

Ziploc baggy or other piece of soft plastic

Delux Materials Scenic Water

Pebbles, stones that are readily available or purchased

Decorations – (lilies are available on my site under flowers-stems-pg3)

What to Do

I always have a bucket of pebbles handy so I used it to make my form. Any other material like sand or cornmeal that will form a depression to work in will do. Dig  a depression into your material of whatever size you choose.

Arrange  the plastic inside the depression with an inch or two extending beyond the finished area you want.Then lay the burlap over the plastic and press into the depression.

Using a caulking gun cover the burlap area with enough caulking to allow the caulking to squeeze up around the stones when you put them in. Arrange stones. After I placed the big ones I sprinkled some smaller ones over it to cover up any caulking that showed between the stones. This could be done after it dries and before adding water as well. You could also use chipped glass – clear for sparkle or perhaps blue.

Let the whole mess dry and cure for 2 hours or according to the directions on the caulking you have.

Add Scenic Water according to directions. When the ‘water’ is about half hardened… in this case with the ‘water’  at less than half an inch deep- in approximately half an hour you can poke decorative flowers in and they will stand up.

Wait about another hour and you can remove the pond by slipping your hand under the plastic. Cover the water area with another piece of plastic to keep it clean while you snip away the extra burlap from the pond edge.

Now you can dig a little whole in your miniature garden for the pond to sit in. Remove the plastic from the bottom of the pond and tuck your pond into it’s new home. I surrounded my edges with loose pebbles and larger stones.Have fun with it!